For Ryozo Morishita, Toyota Municipal Museum of Art, 2012


My subject is life.

The representation of space is a construction of history, habit and thought. We merge these constituencies, catching a glimpse of the passing time: these are recurrences of wonder, anxieties that direct the quiet search for the complexity of life.

My friend Richard Solly, a poet, reads the following poem:


..........Then Let Me Bring

..........At the gate, if we must bring one thing--
..........something wooden and contoured, an antique,
..........a collection of baseball cards, china doll,
..........a song we've composed and played on the violin--
..........to show Saint Peter, to convince him
..........we haven't wasted years on earth complaining
..........about the cold in winter, the heat in summer,
..........one thing that will astonish even the angels,
..........one shape that hadn't been conceived,
..........one word precipitated from the centrifuge
..........of our life, or even a somersault, a salute,
..........a handshake like no other that God has gripped,
..........then let me bring, not a poem, my flute, the box
..........of silver dollars my father left me so my hands
..........might feel the solid touch of money,
..........or even a photograph of my daughter to show the dead;
..........no, instead I will bring this velvet bag, unloosen
..........its string, lift out the orange, red and yellow,
..........and begin tossing the balls into orbit like moons
..........in a path around my body, each one spinning,
..........showing God what my hands have learned
..........when they weren't clutching sorrow. . .



I ask myself what I should bring —
For Ryozo Morishita, Leedy Voulkos Arts Center, 2009


Since ancient times, the expression of art and space has changed as a result of shifts in our understanding of Nature. Deeply related to nature is its influence on God and humanity. In the west, the expression of drawing is often focused on the scientific analysis of being; this ideology stands in confrontation with nature. In Japan, the spiritual analysis of being holds significance, where its understanding emerges through the inhabitation of nature. Thus, the recognition of these concurrent methodologies is an expression toward a symbiotic ideology.

In my works, within the two-dimensional physicality of painting, I would like to offer the possibility of spatial expression inhabiting both methodological processes, acknowledging humanity as part of Nature.